Visit Visa for Children (Minors)

Children under the age of 18 are considered as “minors” in Canada. They are expected to follow the same rules applicable to any other visitor who is visiting Canada. However, depending on the circumstance, the minor may have to carry certain additional documents also.

The Canadian Border Service Agency (CBSA) is on constant lookout for children who are missing or runaway. Depending on the situation and/or circumstance, several questions may be asked to a minor if he or she is travelling alone to Canada, and doesn’t have the required document(s) available with him or her.

If you (or your child) is a minor and is planning to visit Canada, the first thing you will need to check is what travel document is required for you to come to Canada – a TRV or an eTA. To see if what you will need is a TRV or an eTA to come to Canada, click here.

Case 1 (If the minor is travelling alone)

In this case, the minor should present:

  • His own passport to the immigration officer (the minor, in no circumstance, will be allowed entry to Canada if the minor doesn’t have a passport);
  • A legible copy of his or her birth certificate;
  • A letter of authorization signed by the both parents of the minor, or, by the minor’s legal guardian. The letter should clearly mention the address and phone number(s) of the minor’s parents (or legal guardians), as well as the address and telephone number of the person(s) who will be looking after the minor during the minor’s stay in Canada.

Case 2 (If the minor is travelling with one parent only)

In this case, the parent should present:

  • The minor’s passport;
  • A legible copy of the minor’s birth certificate;
  • A letter of authorization signed by the parent who is not travelling with the minor. The letter should clearly mention the address and phone number(s) of the minor’s parent who is not travelling with the minor, as well as a photocopy of the parent’s signed passport or national identity card.

Case 3 (If the minor’s parents are separated or divorced, but share custody of the minor)

In this case, the parent accompanying the minor should present legible copies of legal custody documents.

Case 4 (If the minor’s parents are separated or divorced, and only one of them has sole custody of the minor)

The authorization letter, in this case, must be signed only by the parent who has legal custody of the minor. The parent should also bring a copy of the legal custody decree.

Case 5 (Other circumstances)

  • If one of the minor’s parents is deceased, then the accompanying parent should present the deceased parent’s death certificate;
  • If the minor is travelling with a legal guardian, then the minor should have a copy of the guardianship papers;
  • If the minor is travelling with adoptive parent(s), then the minor should have copies of the adoption papers.

Note: If the case is not any one of the above-mentioned, adequate security screening/scrutiny will be performed by the Canadian Border Service Agency (CBSA) officers before the minor is allowed/denied entry into Canada.

 

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